What does Vision Zero Mean for Los Angeles?

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Please join the Los Angeles Vision Zero Alliance and the City of Los Angeles for a conversation about Mayor Eric Garcetti's new Vision Zero Initiative and what it means for Los Angeles communities. Leah Shahum, founder and director of the Vision Zero Network, will share inspiring stories from other Vision Zero cities around the county and world and Seleta Reynolds, general manager of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation, will preview the City's next steps toward eliminating all traffic deaths here in Los Angeles. Community members are invited to discuss the opportunities and challenges of making Los Angeles streets safe for everyone.

 

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LA Announces Vision Zero Initiative

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Traffic deaths are avoidable and that's why many cities around the world have pledged to eradicate them in a movement known as Vision Zero. We have championed this important movement and now we are so happy to announce that the City of Los Angeles is launching its own Vision Zero initiative, working across city departments to end traffic deaths—and that means everyone on LA roads, not just walkers—within 10 years.

From the press release:

Traffic violence is devastating for families and communities, touching people’s lives unlike other issues. Every year in Los Angeles over 200 people are killed moving about our city, with many more suffering potentially life-changing injuries. No death should be considered acceptable or inevitable. Working together, we can save lives.

We are therefore launching a City of Los Angeles Vision Zero initiative to end all traffic deaths by 2025.

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Who Gets Counted Counts: We Need YOU to Volunteer for the Los Angeles Bike + Ped Count this September

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The fourth biennial Los Angeles Bike+Ped Count is just around the corner! Join LACBCLos Angeles WalksUCLA Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies, and many other community partners at over 180 locations throughout the City of Los Angeles. We need your help as volunteers to collect vital data that will be used to advocate for better bicycle and pedestrian funding for years to come.

You can check locations near you on this MAP.

Please sign up HERE for a count location for one (or more!) of the following shifts:

    • Wednesday, September 16, 7 a.m. to 9 a.m.
    • Wednesday, September 16, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    • Saturday, September 19, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Sign up now to get a location near you! If you have any questions about the count, please email: count@la-bike.org.

Sign up to volunteer today!


Footnotes is Back!

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In the last year, Los Angeles Walks has stepped up our game by joining together with powerful partners on campaigns aligned with our goals of safe, accessible, fun, and equitable streets.

We are pleased to announce the second edition of Footnotes here! In our publication you will find  the status of streets across the city, the people they serve, and the next steps of the journey ahead. Find exclusive stories from Los Angeles's most admirable pedestrians and learn about the nuanced landscapes they lie above.

This publication was made possible by Melendrez, thank you!

Donate today to receive your copy!


Pacoima Pedestrian Safety Workshop

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Register for a free Pedestrian Safety Workshop in Pacoima. The workshop, scheduled for Saturday, August 29 9 am- 130 pm, will offer community residents and other participants a chance to walk in Pacoima to see challenges and opportunities to making the neighborhood a safer place for pedestrians. LA Walks supports Pacoima Beautiful’s http://www.pacoimabeautiful.org/  and California Walk’s http://californiawalks.org/ efforts to increase pedestrian safety in Pacoima.

Register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1rfEjy8UtFbej44CHacMK_y9J7i52m574Q1eOKTejEzY/viewform


Support Mobility Plan 2035 for a Safer, More Sustainable Transportation

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On Tuesday August 4, the Los Angeles City Council will consider Mobility Plan 2035, the first comprehensive update to the city’s transportation policies since 1999. A lot has changed since the 1990s: we now have regular CicLAvias, and the voter-approved expansion of the region’s transit system is rapidly under construction. Our streets are now seen as places for people, not just thoroughfares for cars. Technologies like real-time transit info, ride hailing apps, and bike share promise to give Angelenos new tools to take full advantage of the new infrastructure being built. The adoption of the unprecedented Plan for a Healthy Los Angeles earlier this year has grounded mobility conversations in the context of health and equity, recognizing that better transportation policy provides economic mobility for underserved residents while promoting community health and active transportation. And, Mayor Eric Garcetti’s Sustainable City pLAn calls for increasing walking, biking and transit to 35% of all trips in just 10 years to help meet the city’s greenhouse gas reduction goals. The resulting Mobility Plan 2035 is a plan that is right for Los Angeles and right for our multimodal future.

 

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YES (Youth Envisioned Streets) for a Healthier South LA

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Please donate today to help youth re-envision Central Avenue to be as great as it can be!

Los Angeles Walks is excited to partner with National Health Foundation, A Place Called Home, Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition and the Coalition for Responsible Community Development on YES (Youth Envisioned Streets) for a Healthier South LA.

The project will empower South LA youth to plan and execute a one-day community event to take place on Central Avenue in 2016.

Youth from South LA will lead the creative direction and vision for this event, which will reflect Central Avenue's rich culture and history. Participating youth will develop temporary pop-up street treatments to increase ped and bike safety and encourage active transportation. There will also be youth-designed organic vegetable gardens and healthy food demonstrations.

This project is a recipient of Mayor Eric Garcetti's Great Streets Challenge Grant. The grant is based on matched funding raised through individual donations. We are working together to raise $10,000 to fund our project.

More info here and donate!

Please join us Thursday August 20 for a fundraiser benefitting YES! Youth Envisioned Streets and other Great Streets Challenge projects. 6-11pm at City Labs. More info here.


Los Angeles Is Talking About Safe Streets

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It was an energizing week for pedestrian rights here in LA, with plenty of discussions in the media about what it will take to make the city safe and accessible to all walkers. Los Angeles Walks was honored to be included in four articles on the growing movement around safe streets in the city.

First the Los Angeles Times released its map on the most dangerous intersections for walkers in the city. Our own Deborah Murphy was interviewed by Laura Nelson about the corner of Slauson and Western:

“There is so much work to be done here,” Deborah Murphy, an urban planner who runs Los Angeles Walks, a pedestrian advocacy group, said as she surveyed the streets on a recent afternoon. The wide intersection, anchored by three strip malls and a gas station, felt like a highway: Cars sped through it, and vehicles leaving parking lots narrowly zipped past children on bikes and old women with wire carts.

 

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City of Los Angeles Sidewalk Infrastructure Program

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Jessica Meaney, managing director of Investing in Place, is a transportation advocate who has been living intentionally car free in Los Angeles for over 15 years. Academically trained as a sociologist, Jessica’s approach to transportation policy began with looking at the key roles public transit, walking and bicycling play in social cohesion and  community health. Jessica’s policy approach has focused on using transportation finance research and advocacy efforts to achieve those outcomes, particularly in low income communities and communities of color.

The sidewalks in the City of Los Angeles represent one of the most critical public spaces, but are not yet afforded the same luxuries many other transportation infrastructure projects enjoy such as strategic planning, data and inventory collection, comprehensive funding or being viewed as a core part of the transportation network. The City of Los Angeles has backlog of broken and unmaintained sidewalks totaling over 10,000 miles with a estimated price tag to fix over $1 Billion. Since the mid 1970’s the City has not kept up with maintaining its sidewalks, and for the past ten years has been discussing this issue in committees that consider motions, staff reports, and numerous public testimony on how sidewalks should be funded and maintained. Yet still no inventory or strategic plan exists on this basic infrastructure need (see recent Los Angeles Times article).  A recent legal settlement with disability advocates on the quality of the City of Los Angeles sidewalks has the potential to change all this.

 

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#MobilityMondayLA; Support a Safer, More Sustainable Transportation Future for L.A.

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Take Action to Support the City of Los Angeles Mobility Plan!

Please join us today, Monday June 15th for #MobilityMondayLA to show support for Mobility Plan 2035:

  1. Email and call your councilmember (find your councilmember here) - sample below
  2. Share/tweet that you did it! (sample tweet: “I just called @PaulKoretzCD5 to support Mobility Plan 2035. You should too! #MobilityMondayLA”)

Later this month, the Los Angeles City Council will consider Mobility Plan 2035, the first comprehensive update to the city’s transportation policies since 1999. A lot has changed since the 1990s: we now have regular CicLAvias, everyday bike ridership has spiked, and the voter-approved expansion of the region’s transit system is rapidly under construction. Our streets are now seen as places for people, not just thoroughfares for cars. Technologies like real-time transit info, ride hailing apps, and bike share promise to give Angelenos new tools to take full advantage of the new infrastructure being built. The adoption of the unprecedented Plan for a Healthy Los Angeles earlier this year has grounded mobility conversations in the context of health and equity, recognizing that better transportation policy provides economic mobility for underserved residents while promoting community health and active transportation. And, Mayor Eric Garcetti’s Sustainable City pLAn calls for increasing walking, biking and transit to 35% of all trips in just 10 years to help meet the city’s greenhouse gas reduction goals. The resulting Mobility Plan 2035 is a plan that is right for Los Angeles and right for our multimodal future.

 

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